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Trouble relaxing during a big project?

Deadlines, delays, emails, and weekends seem to slow down projects, sometimes to a grinding halt. These same things leave the project manager feeling they can never take a vacation or even just a day or two away from the office. Without taking time away from tasks it has been proven that we are less productive and make more mistakes. Society seems to pride itself on the ability to work endless hours for the company, though  it hurts the firm .

I fall trap to the same mindset as most workers in this high-tech world at times. Last week, I decided to change things up and go on a vacation with my wife without my laptop. We strolled the streets of Orlando, playing putt-putt at Citywalk. Then drove up to Savannah, GA for a few days. I was able to relax and unwind without having to worry about work for an entire week.

Notice I did not mention that I did not work during the week. I managed all the projects I started before the trip from my iPad and iPhone. I spent a few minutes here and there updating project statuses for customers and directing my developers through our online collaboration software. This gave me the freedom of enjoying my vacation while still keeping in the loop on all tasks with my global team.

I have found that quality of life does not have to diminish just because you are running a team or an entire organization. In a way, it is almost like having a superpower, you can complete more than anyone else in other organizations with half of the effort. How many entrepreneurs do you know that take a week off after just three months of opening the doors? I was not even able to get that kind of time away from the office after two years with the last company I worked.

Isn’t it time you take a break from the desk and start enjoying life with your family and friends?

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What changes when teams are virtual?

To be successful, virtual managers must be aware of the challenges of overseeing virtual teams:
* The absence of non-verbal communication. Subtle indicators such as the silent nod of approval or the raised eyebrow of disapproval are eliminated in virtual teams. Words of praise for a job well done should be conveyed in virtual meetings so that practitioners know they are on the right track.
* Working across time zones. Schedules for meetings must be sensitive to team members in multiple time zones. In extreme cases (such as a team with practitioners in both Asia and North America), the number of common waking hours is limited and finding meeting times can be difficult.
* The difficulty of building rapport. Rapport is essential for functional team work but often difficult to establish and develop when people don’t have the opportunity to meet in person and get to know each other. This can be overcome by facilitating social interaction between team members.
* Over-reliance on email and telephone communication. The narrow communication channel available to virtual team members can lead to a sense of isolation. It can also cause frustration if colleagues err in causing email overload by their efforts to provide information.
* Managing conflict at arm’s length. Research has cited conflict management as a challenge for virtual teams, although it could be argued that less contact means less conflict.

VIRTUAL TEAMS SUCCEED BY USING BEST PRACTICES
The growth in popularity of virtual teams has prompted a number of researchers to take a closer look at what makes the good ones work. They have found that the most successful teams follow these best practices:
* Institute strong leadership. Executives must fully support the virtual structure and be aware of the potential challenges of managing a virtual team. They should consistently monitor the team’s progress to ensure deadlines are being met and budgets are on track.
* Choose the right team members. Individuals should be selected with a view to forming a successful team. Not all practitioners will thrive in a virtual environment. Those who are self-reliant and self-motivated will fare best.
* Set expectations from the start. Articulate objectives and define team member roles up front to avoid the possibility of overlooking or duplicating aspects of the work. This is especially important given the geographical distance between members of a virtual team.
* Implement strict protocols. Establishing protocols will ensure that each team member knows when and how quickly to respond to action items, and will determine the steps to take when a team member fails to do so. Team meetings should be run by a strong chair. People should be prompted to give their opinions as opposed to volunteering them. Digressions should be discouraged as they tend to disengage other team members. Multitasking during meetings should be prohibited.
* Use proven processes. Teams need processes that govern the way they work and how the work will get done, from being aware of individual responsibilities and decision-making procedures to the consequences of poor work or missed deadlines. Virtual teams have little margin for error when it comes to project management, as problems can go unnoticed and grow into major issues.
* Manage timelines and budgets carefully. Often a project budget will dictate the number of hours that can be charged to a client. Because freelance practitioners are paid according to the time they take, budgets can easily be exceeded if not properly monitored.
* Establish meaningful project milestones. Milestones should be implemented to chart a project’s progress and act as checkpoints for the timeliness and quality of virtual team work.
* Encourage interaction. Leadership must ensure that team members have some mechanism by which to develop strong working relationships. They should also bring team members together by organizing social functions every few months to help them build rapport.
* Communicate more efficiently.Virtual teams can be connected by various technologies, including phone, email, instant messaging, video or web conferencing, or virtual project collaboration software like that found at 2tasks.com. Use more than one of these options so team members can choose the technology they’re most comfortable with. In addition, more communications do not necessarily mean better communication. Too many emails can lead to information overload and cause important issues to be overlooked. The key is to convey only relevant information, and to do so clearly and consistently.
* Minimize team conflict. Although conflict can lead to better ideas and solutions, conflicts within a virtual team should be dealt with immediately, because they can escalate quickly. Virtual teams do not build rapport as easily as other teams, and managers may have to become more involved in conflict resolution.

Virtual Project Collaboration

Eric Stacy

Virtual project collaboration is a growing industry in the United States and around the world as more companies are utilizing the traditional less often than any other time in history. Teams  around the world and workers need a way to collaborate with one another and their customers. Small companies are finding it easier to compete with larger firms by leveraging tasks with lower overhead and a diverse workforce.

This trend not only increases the job market in remote cities, but also gives employees the freedom to work from anywhere they want. Not being limited to a cubical in an office setting, younger employees now travel while they work, or raise families without missing out on important family functions.

As with any change to a company’s culture, management still needs to feel they have control of projects assigned to people and/or teams. This is now done in Virtual Project Collaboration software. Teams can attach documents, images, source code, etc. all in an easy to use online offering free, or with a low monthly cost. Outside of document retention, chat, task lists (to-do list), and time stamped history, managers have all they need to manage projects successfully.

There is no need to spin up a server, do maintenance, conduct backups, or any other form of IT tasks. Being cloud based, the data is available to you and your team 24x7x365 with full redundancy and secured is a way that is parallel to that of the large banks.

For a free trial, follow this link over to 2tasks.com and check it out. There is no need to enter credit card or personal information to start a project in two minutes that is free for 60 days. If you decide it is not a fit for you or your organization, simply don’t upgrade and there will be no billing. You are free from spam as well, as your email address will never be sold or shared with any third-party.

Let us know what you think of the product and if we can help, we will even add your requests to the next release.

The Circus Life of a Business Owner

This is a great write up on the complications of being a business owner.

Sutton Creative Studios

Travel and Laughter by W. TiptonClient phone calls, vendor emails, prospective client meetings, networking gatherings, training seminars, and strategy sessions… This is just a portion of the circus life of a business owner. With so many tasks to be accomplished, finding time to actually work can feel like a clown juggling 15 flaming torches at once. How do you actually focus on one task without all the rest falling down around you?

Just like in the circus, you can’t get to the main event in your business without partaking in all the sideshows. While they may seem trivial and cumbersome, the tasks accomplished during the perilous walk across the tightrope can make or break your business. Because of this, it’s important to not miss a step along the way.

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